Casebook: The War of 1812
 
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Casebook: The War of 1812
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Official Documents
Proclamation of NeturalityApril 22 1793
The Sedition ActJanuary 1 1798
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The Berlin DecreeNovember 21 1806
Order in CouncilJanuary 7 1807
Jefferson's Message to Congress on the Embargo, Preparations for Possible War, etc.October 27 1807
Jefferson talks about institution of the embargo because of the maritime difficulties with France and Britain, the gunboat navy, and plans for the army
Order in CouncilNovember 11 1807
Milan DecreeDecember 17 1807
Embargo ActDecember 22 1807
Jefferson's Message to Congress on Suspension of the Trade Embargo, Western Indians, etc.November 8 1808
President reflects that his suspension of the embargo has not had the desired effect with France or Britain, but he reports progress in regard to peace with the Indians, construction of defensive works, etc.
Non-Intercourse ActMarch 1 1809
Rambouillet DecreeMarch 23 1810
Macon's Bill No. 2May 1 1810
President Madison's Third State of Nation AddressNovember 5 1811
President Madison expresses disappointment that the British have not repealed the Orders in Council prohibiting trade by neutrals with Europe. He mentions an incident off the U.S. coast with British ships hovering: war seems to be looming.
Andrew Jackson's Call for Volunteers in March 1812March 1 1812
Always a War Hawk, Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson calls for volunteers to help defend the United States in the upcoming war with Great Britain.
War Message of President James MadisonJune 1 1812
After having explored numerous means of peaceful resolution, President Madison resorted to a recommendation of a declaration of war against Great Britain.
An Act Declaring War Between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland . . . and the United States of AmericaJune 18 1812
An Act for the Safe Keeping and Accommodation of Prisoners of WarJuly 6 1812
The President is authorized to make such regulations and arrangements for the safekeeping, support and exchange of prisoners of war as he may deem expedient, until the same shall be otherwise provided for by law.
An Act to Prohibit American Vessels from Proceeding to or Trading with the Enemies of the United StatesJuly 6 1812
The master of any vessel trading with the United States shall give bond that they will not proceed to or trade with enemies of the United States.
The Star-Spangled BannerSeptember 14 1814
Here are the famous, stirring words that Francis Scott Key penned on the back of an envelope as he witnessed the bombardment of Fort McHenry, Baltimore, on September 13-14, 1814.
Brig. Gen. John Stricker to Maj. Gen. Samuel Smith: Report on the Battle of North PointSeptember 15 1814
Stricker reports that as ordered he went down Patapsco Neck and engaged the British. Although a flanking maneuver by the British caused disintegration of his left flank, his best two regiments, the 5th and 27th, held and dealt the British a blow.
Proposed War of 1812 MonumentSeptember 23 1814
Engraving based on plans to build a memorial to the heroes of the United States Navy of the War of 1812 that was proposed in 1814 but never built.
Treaty of GhentDecember 24 1814
After two years of war, both sides agreed to end the dispute and restore both countries to the state in which they were found before the war began.
Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson Writes to Maj. Gen. John Lambert in the Aftermath of the American Victory in the Battle of New OrleansJanuary 8 1815
Jackson, the victor of the Battle of New Orleans, a crushing defeat for the British, wrote to the British commander, Maj. Gen. John Lambert to discuss burial of the British dead and parole of prisoners and wounded.
President Madison's Message to Congress on the End of the WarFebruary 18 1815
President Madison expresses satisfaction that the war has been brought to an end. He congratulates Congress and the U.S. armed forces for the successes during the war.
Old IronsidesSeptember 16 1830
This famous poem celebrating the U.S.S. Constitution, the storied frigate of the War of 1812, was written as a protest after the poet read of a U.S. Navy plan to scrap the vessel.
A Veteran of the War of 1812 Talks to Nathaniel HawthorneDecember 15 1856
Nathaniel Hawthorne, in his English Note-books, recalls a 1856 chat with a War of 1812 veteran who was at the Battles of the Thames and New Orleans

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Copyright © Christopher T. George, 2012